FALL 2023

Friday, September 22, 2023

Speaker: Dr. Erin Wessling, Harvard University
Title: Evaluating the ecological basis of Pan divergence
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Friday, October 6, 2023

Speaker: Dr. Doug Kennett, U. or California, Santa Barbara
Title: Coevolutionary Dynamics of Humans and Domesticates in Central America
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Thursday, October 19, 2023

Speaker: Dr. Darren Blyer, Simon Fraser University
Title: Terror Capitalism: Producing the "Terrorist-Worker" in Northwest China
Time: 4:00-5:00 pm
Location: ZOOM - link
https://rutgers.zoom.us/j/3112493330?pwd=dVd1ZHJvQU9tSGZiSjFWRzIvQlcrQT09
Meeting ID: 311 249 3330
Password: 011884
Co-sponsored by the Rutgers Center for Chinese Studies
for Darren Byler talkBio: Darren Byler is an anthropologist at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia and the author of Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke University Press 2022) and In the Camps: China's High-Tech Penal Colony (Columbia Global Reports 2021). His current research and teaching are focused on theories of policing, infrastructure development and global China. 

Abstract:
This talk focuses on some of the key ideas of Byler’s ethnographic monograph Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City. Drawing on more than 24 months of ethnographic research in the Uyghur region of Northwest China and nearby Kazakhstan between 2011 and 2020, internal police documents, and interviews with current and former “terrorist-workers” before their detention in 2017, interviews with their family members since detention, and in several cases post release, it considers how Muslim farmers are produced digitally and materially as unfree workers under the sign of terrorism.
Image by Nicola Zolin, used by permission

Friday, November 3, 2023

Speaker: Dr. Michael Chazan, University of Toronto
Title: The Role of the Calahari in Human Evolution
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Wednesday, November 8, 2023

Speaker: Dr. Siobhan Mattison, University of New Mexico
Title: Using health and demography to resolve evolutionary paradoxes of family structure
Time: 10:30 am
Location: RAB-001, Douglass Campus
BIO:
Siobhan Mattison is an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico. From 2019 until this year she also served as a program director in the National Science Foundation’s cultural anthropology program. She earned her Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of Washington in 2010. Dr. Mattison is a human behavioral ecologist who focuses on gender and health disparities. She maintains field sites both in China among the Musuo ethnic group and in the Pacific island nation of Vanuatu.

Wednesday, November 8, 2023

Speaker: Dr. Kristina Nazimova, Rutgers University
Time: 2:00 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, 3rd floor atrium
Sponsored by Anthropology Graduate Student Association (AGSA)

Friday, November 17, 2023

AndrewVanHornSpeaker: Dr. Andrew Van Horn
Title: Mud Cloth to Machine Learning: Perception and attention in the composition and analysis of artworks
Time: 12:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, 3rd floor atrium
Sponsored by Anthropology Graduate Student Association (AGSA)
BIO:
Dr. Van Horn is a postdoctoral scholar working across the disciplines of art history, digital humanities and anthropology.  He will discuss how our visual systems and our capacity for shared attention affect our engagement with art.

Friday, December 1, 2023

Speaker: Dr. David Lawson, University of California, Santa Barbara
Title: Forging an applied evolutionary anthropology of gendered conflict
Time: 10:30 am
Location: RAB-001, Douglass
BIO:
David Lawson is a tenured associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at UCSB, where he directs the Applied Evolutionary Anthropology Lab. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology in 2009 from University College London. He lists his interests as human behavioral ecology and cultural evolutionary approaches to human behavior. His work has focused primarily on conflicts of interest and trade-offs in human familial relationships and the application of evolutionary models to public and global health practices. He conducts fieldwork in Tanzania in collaboration with the Tanzanian National Institute for Medical Research.

Friday, December 8, 2023

Speaker: Dr. Nicole Thompson Gonzalez, U. of California, Santa Barbara
Title: We are not the same: Diversity of primate social strategies between and within individuals
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Wednesday, December 13, 2023

Speaker: Dr. Jonathan Stieglitz, Toulouse School of Economics, France
Title: Evolutionary perspectives on human health and life history
Time: 10:30 am
Location: RAB-206, Douglass
BIO:
Jonathan Stieglitz is a Scientific Director at the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse and in the Department of Social and Behavioral Science at the Toulouse School of Economics. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of New Mexico in 2009. Dr. Stieglitz specializes in evolutionary medicine, in particular human health and aging, and human behavioral ecology. He conducts fieldwork among the Tsimane of Bolivia.

Friday, December 15, 2023

Speaker: Dr. Adrian Jaeggi, University of Zurich
Title: Cooperation in small-scale societies: Ecology and health
Time: 10:30 am
Location: LOR-020, Cook/Douglass (72 Lippman Drive)
BIO:
Adrian Jaeggi is an assistant professor, head of the Human Ecology Group, and Deputy Chair of the Institute of Evolutionary Medicine at the University of Zurich. He earned his Ph.D. in biological anthropology in 2010 from that same institution. Although he was trained as a primatologist and is an expert in that field, he retooled as a human behavioral ecologist under the supervision of his postdoc supervisor Michael Gurven at UCSB. Like Gurven and others, Dr. Jaeggi conducts field research among the Tsimane people of Bolivia. His primary interest is in the evolution of human social behavior and its relation to health.

 SPRING 2024

Friday, January 26, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Thomas Plummer, City U. of New York (CUNY)
Title: Oldowan occurrences on the Homa Peninsula, Kenya
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Friday, February 2, 2024

Speaker: Robin Nelson, Arizona State University
Title: Kin, Community, and the Complexity of Everyday Life: Building Theory in Studies of Family Making and Kin Investment
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)
  pdf flyer (600 KB)
Abstract: While kinship has served as a principal anthropological research topic for decades, who we consider kin, and how we understand those relationships to come into being and transmute continues to shift in response to changing theoretical orientations and movements away from orthodox conceptualizations of the family. We are now exploring how cultural identity and practice, resource availability, and social positionality mediate individual decisions regarding kin making. My research examines these facets of kinship and care in the contemporary contexts of urban and migrating populations living in industrialized environments. In this talk, I will discuss how evolutionary anthropological conceptualizations and assessments of investment have structured our theory building and data collection, while sometimes obscuring the complexity of lived relations. With evidence from my research on created relations, kin investment, identity, and health at three sites, I suggest that a grounded biocultural theory may enable us to navigate some of the more complicated human behavioral patterns (such as intra-gender conflict and trans-generational antipathy) that have been relegated to anecdotes and cast aside in favor of more easily operationalizable data. Similarly, a better theoretical and methodological integration of the fluidity of kin networks while recognizing the everyday challenges navigated within these relationships enables anthropologists to re-visit what we understand to be the core behaviors that have shaped human evolution.

Tuesday, February 6, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Herman Pontzer, Duke University
Title: Healthy as a Hunter-Gatherer: Evolutionary Insights from Small-Scale Societies
Time: 3:00 PM
Location: The Alampi Room, Marine Science Building 1st Floor
Dean's Distinguished Lecture Series
  pdf flyer (370 KB)

Wednesday, February 7, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Ilaria Patania, Rutgers University
Time: noon
Location: Ruth Adams Building 3rd Floor Atrium, Douglass
Pizza served
Sponsored by AGSA
  document flyer (987 KB)

 Friday, February 16, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Radu Iovita, New York University
Title: The Paleolithic Silk Road
Time: 3:30
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Friday, February 23, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Pablo Seward Delaporte, Brown University (Postdoc) and Saint Louis University (Assistant Professor)
Title:  Toward a Phenomenology of "Politics": Vulnerability, Relationality, and the Making of "Hard" Corporeal Selves in Chile's Migrant Campamentos
Time: 3:00  pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building 3rd floor atrium, Douglass
Sponsored by AGSA
  document flyer (385 KB)

Friday, March 1, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Stephanie Poindexter, University of Buffalo
Title: Revisiting our understanding of nocturnal primates
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Friday, March 22, 2024

Speaker: Aalyia Feroz Ali Sadruddin, Assistant Professor UNC-Chapel Hill and Visiting Research Fellow Brown University
Title: Tides of Time: Aging and Women's Bodies in Rwanda
Time: Noon
Location: virtual via ZOOM or can watch ZOOM meeting in Ruth Adams Building 3rd floor atrium, Douglass
Sponsored by Critical Interventions in Theory and Ethnography (CITE)
ZOOM link    -  
https://rutgers.zoom.us/j/97275183523?pwd=NnpiUGVPOHVBQWsraG9tR2FYcGlOZz09
pdf Flyer AALYIA SADRUDDIN 22 MARCH (736 KB)
About the talk
: In this talk, Dr. Aalyia Sadruddin shares some ethnographic reflections from Rwanda, where she has
been working with women who experienced a mixture of imvururu (violent interruptions) during the
adulthood phase of their life course. Imvururu meddled with critical rites of passage such as
menstruation, pregnancy, breastfeeding, and motherhood, leaving many to question their personhood
and place in society. Now in the late (and final) phase of their life course, women from this generation
are seeking to reexperience, or experience for the first time, those critical rites of passage through
engaging in various self-fashioned bodily practices. Two such practices include singing to one’s body
and keeping company with expectant mothers, which emerge as essential pathways for elderly women
to embody, again, the temporalities of adulthood. Countering dominant stereotypes of aging women’s
bodies as “unproductive” entities and the late-life phase of the life course as “stagnant,” the
experiences of Rwanda’s elderly women reveal the corporeal registers through which healing and
personhood are sought in the long-term wake of violence. 
Aalyia Feroz Ali Sadruddin is Assistant Professor of Cultural and Medical Anthropology Department of Anthropology UNC-Chapel Hill and Visiting Research Fellow (2023-24) Watson Institute of International & Public Affairs Brown University

 

Friday, March 29, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Luca Pozzi, U. of Texas, San Antonio
Title: Unlocking cryptic diversity: genes, museums, and the challenges of climate change
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Abstract: Climate change stands as the defining crisis of our era, leading to the imminent extinction of numerous species. Yet, our understanding of current species diversity and the historical forces influencing diversification across time and space remains limited. A significant obstacle in characterizing biodiversity patterns is the fact that a considerable portion of this diversity remains cryptic from human knowledge. Here, I will discuss the past, present, and future of biodiversity research, exploring the potential of museum genomics to enhance our understanding of species diversity and the diversification of one of the least studied primate groups—the lorisiforms. Enhancing the clarity of species diversity also holds vital implications for the conservation of wild populations. A more precise grasp of species boundaries and ranges can significantly contribute to the implementation of effective conservation strategies.
   pdf flyer (1.43 MB)

Friday, April 12, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Anthony Lopez, Washington State U., Vancouver
Title: Coalitional Conflict: From the Grammar of Violence to the Laws of War
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Friday, April 19, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Kevin Hatala and Dr. Erin Marie Williams, Chatham University - joint lecture
Title: Reevaluating classic hypotheses through new lenses: how technology is clarifying our biomechanical past
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)

Friday, April 26, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Robert Lynch, Penn State University
Title: The Impact of market integration and religion on social networks
Time: 3:30 pm
Location: Ruth Adams Building, Douglass RAB-001
Sponsored by Center for Human Evolutionary Studies (CHES)